Alder Hey staff reach target to teach 1,000 children and teenagers life-saving skills on Restart a Heart Day

Alder Hey staff reach target to teach 1,000 children and teenagers life-saving skills on Restart a Heart Day

Alder Hey staff reach target to teach 1,000 children and teenagers life-saving skills on Restart a Heart Day

16th Oct 2018

Life-saving CPR skills were taught to children and teenagers at Alder Hey Children’s Hospital and schools across Merseyside as part of World Restart a Heart Day.

World Restart a Heart Day is an annual event, which aims to train as many people as possible in CPR in one day.

It is a joint campaign organised by the British Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council (UK), British Red Cross, St John Ambulance and ambulance trusts and fire and rescue services across the UK.

Staff at Alder Hey taught CPR to teachers at schools across Merseyside and then supported them in leading group sessions to pupils on the day.

Dr Ronx, the newest presenter on CBBC’s Operation Ouch!, also joined resuscitation officers in the atrium of Alder Hey to help teach essential skills to children and teenagers.

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Deputy Director of Health Care Professionals at Alder Hey Rob Griffiths said: “There are more than 30,000 out of hospital cardiac arrests each year.

“We know that when basic life support is performed prior to the emergency services arriving that victims’ not only have a greater chance of survival, but also a greater chance of leaving hospital without any permanent injury.

“By teaching the next generation these life-saving skills we are increasing the chance of having somebody in the right place at the right time when it really matters.”

A cardiac arrest happens when a person’s heart suddenly stops pumping blood around their body, usually due to a problem with sending electrical signals to the heart.

This means the heart stops pumping blood and the brain is starved of oxygen, causing the person to fall unconscious and stop breathing.

The chance of survival for patients who have a cardiac arrest without a bystander available to attempt CPR is almost zero. Watch our 'How to do CPR' video below:

                                         

Chief Executive of the British Heart Foundation Simon Gillespie said: “Survival rates from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in the UK are shockingly low, with less than one in ten people surviving. Not enough people have the skills and confidence to perform CPR and sadly this is costing thousands of lives every year.

“A cardiac arrest is the ultimate medical emergency and the worst thing you can do is nothing. CPR really can mean the difference between life and death so we need to ensure that many more people are trained in CPR.”

He added: “We want everyone to know how to save a life. We are continually looking for new ways to show the public that stepping in and doing something is far better than doing nothing.”

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